Three reasons I like to read not-so-well-known blogs

Excellent post and this does not come from a fan of the blogging mutual admiration society. One reason I’ve identified why my blog is still confidential (beside reason 1) after 6+ months, is that I have “the bum between 2 chairs” as Voltaire would put it: promoting my coaching, exploring and experimenting with my new “niche” with the metaphor/archetype of Icarus :coaching young (less young?) passionate souls (the artist for ex) in a dispassionate (as over pragmatic) professional climate. So the need to be, look, feel pro on the one hand. On the other hand, I enjoy genuinely connecting through blogging and sometimes it’s not so pro…carnivalesque even, with the breaking of boundaries (fool archetype) this mode of interaction sometimes entails: oops! But I don’t think I would have learned so much about the people I am interested to coach without taking this risk. Electronic words stay, be careful of reputation, I hear from colleagues: Diderot’s prudent ‘esprit de l’escalier”, for another reason of not being so well known does take over at times. A pity. I’m not the type to live a double life separating the pro from the casual, even though some limits in the right place are warranted, I admit. Does such a blog semi-pro, semi-blogging has a chance? We’ll see. For the meantime, I am still enjoying the experiment.
Michal at Happy Heuristics!

bottledworder

Full many a gem of purest ray serene
The dark unfathomed caves of ocean bear:
Full many a flower is born to blush unseen,
And waste its sweetness on the desert air. (from “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” by Thomas Gray)

There are certainly many excellent established blogs out there. I love to read them. But I also like to scour the blogopsphere for hidden gems.

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Gammify: the 21 Century Name of the Game

Gamification of Fitness
Physiologically speaking, there are 2 classic ways to lose weight: food intake reduction or/and burning off calories. Wii Fit and its gamification ploys seem to represent a third one, according to L, an anti-fitness acquaintance. Ever since I know her, L could never stick to a fitness routine. She’s always had something to say about the fitness instructor ‘who did not like her’ at the gym, to justify her giving up or she used to say that she felt like in the chamber of torture. [I don’t blame her. If you’ve followed this blog, you know that I am not a fan of starvation or torture myself, and the ‘physical’ solution is only one part of the answer. Not only TLC (Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes) but also TLC (Tender (self) Love and Care, for example) are called for for weightloss] Lo and behold at our next encounter: I’d swear she’d lost 20 pounds. Continue reading

Mistakology/failurology: the Icarus Paradox

Learn from the mistakes of others. You can’t live long enough to make them all yourself.

Eleanor Roosevelt

The root of all superstition is that men observe when a thing hits, but not when it misses.

Francis Bacon.

Icarus paradoxIt is a truism of self-development that you learn more from your mistakes/failures than from your successes. It’s even better still to learn from other people’s, organization’s mistakes/failures, especially if they follow unprecedented successes. To that effect, Dan Miller, coined the expression “The Icarus Paradox”, for the arrogance of outstanding companies leading to their downfall. The paradox is that your greatest assets, talents, victories, strengths may turn into a liability. In his book by the same name, Miller shows through 4 distinct trajectories how these exceptional companies become their own worst enemy. Continue reading