Gilberts’s Icarus: Reframing Failure

Failing and Flying

by Jack Gilbert

Everyone forgets that Icarus also flew.
It’s the same when love comes to an end,
or the marriage fails and people say
they knew it was a mistake, that everybody
said it would never work. That she was
old enough to know better. But anything
worth doing is worth doing badly.
Like being there by that summer ocean
on the other side of the island while
love was fading out of her, the stars
burning so extravagantly those nights that
anyone could tell you they would never last.
Every morning she was asleep in my bed
like a visitation, the gentleness in her
like antelope standing in the dawn mist.
Each afternoon I watched her coming back
through the hot stony field after swimming,
the sea light behind her and the huge sky
on the other side of that. Listened to her
while we ate lunch. How can they say
the marriage failed? Like the people who
came back from Provence (when it was Provence)
and said it was pretty but the food was greasy.
I believe Icarus was not failing as he fell,
but just coming to the end of his triumph. Continue reading

Hyperdialectic: A Structural and Structuring Heuristics

Dynamics of Opposites: Hyperdialectic

What
 we
 call 
hyperdialectic 
is 
a
 thought…that
 is
 capable
 of 
reaching 
truth 
because 
it
 envisages 
without restriction 
the
 plurality 
of 
the
 relationships 
and
 what 
has 
been 
called ambiguity. The bad dialectic 
is
 that 
which
 thinks
 it 
recomposes
 being 
by 
a 
thetic 
thought, by 
an
 assemblage
 of 
statements, 
by 
thesis,
 antithesis,
 and 
synthesis; 
the
 good 
dialectic
 is 
that
 which
 is
 conscious 
of 
the fact 
that
 every
 thesis
 is 
an
 idealization, that
 Being 
is
 not 
made 
up
 of
 idealizations
 or 
of 
things
 said, 
as
 the 
old
 logic 
believed, 
but 
of 
bound
 wholes 
where
 signification 
never 
is 
except 
in tendency*, where the inertia of the content never permits the defining of one term as positive, another term as negative, and still less a third term as absolute suppression of the negative by itself. (Merleau-Ponty The Visible and Invisible)

Continue reading

Lost in Costanza

This post is a lesson on one great way to go about getting some insight from one’s dreams. George Costanza, fool extraordinaire, I wish he came in my dreams. If you want to become a a philosopher you’ll get a PhD with Seinfeld : all the characters are obnoxious and …bigger than life .
After a session of Seinfeld (as often as possible), I can say with Somerset Maugham
“It’s a funny thing about life; if you refuse to accept anything
but the best, you very often get it.”
Happy Heuristics

Dream Steps : a bloneironic

perfect marks - June 12, 2013d
 

I’ve had the entire cast of Seinfeld in my dreams…

…including, to my chagrin, George Costanza…

The loser to end all losers!

Whether I like it or not, if he’s in my dreams, some part of him must represent some a part of me…

So what do I share with that sniveling, lazy, self-centered, fearful sycophant?

Please don’t answer…

Well, I do see one trait in common:

We want everything to be just right.

Perfect.

George celebrates the perfect parking space at the hospital.  He tries to combine sex, food, and TV for the perfect experience.  We know how these attempts will end: in disaster.

When he finds the perfect girlfriend, the perfection makes him so nervous that he destroys the relationship…

If you’re trying to maintain a state of perfection, of course you’re going to worry!  The perfect situation can not remain perfect.  Change is the nature of…

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Icarus versus Goldilocks

Simplicity versus dumbing down

Goldilocks_IcarusEveryone in the Western world knows the story of “Goldilocks and the Three Bears”, with the 3 memorable porridge bowls: not too hot, not too cold but at the just right temperature. These last few years, in the world of self-development and business/marketing, you may have encountered her tale as a metaphor for making the just right choice, finding the just right solution, client, career, level of productivity, preferences, even life-purpose and whatnot. Continue reading