“Dreams” by Wislawa Szymborska

” He looked at his own Soul with a Telescope.
What seemed all irregular, he saw and shewed to
be beautiful Constellations: and he added to the
consciousness hidden worlds within worlds.”
Coleridge, NotebooksXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

I have reblogged this post from dreamrly and got acquainted with it from http://symbolreader.net/
If you’ve read any of my posts, you may have noticed my interest with “the dream world”.This post /blog shares this interest and an astute poem by Wislawa Szymborska open to discussion, especially about dreams beyond analysis. I find it a po(e)tent means (one “Telescope” of sorts) at “looking at [one’s] soul “as Coleridge so aptly put it.XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

dreamingly yours,
MichalXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Related PostsXXX
https://happyheuristics.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/metaphors-coaching-with-right-brain-modalities/
https://happyheuristics.wordpress.com/2013/07/01/mythology-1-evolution-as-revelation/

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The Feminist Icarista: Ana Mendieta

Last Silueta

You fell into the pit of Cuban revolution, first exodus

And you were told: “it’s no good lingering over the pit

In war anything and everything goes, if you want to fit”

Peripheral excavating of thy heritage wills your uprising

 Pedro Pan girl in American exile, won’t states’ plaything

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Letters To A Young Poet

letters Young Poet

I wish I were young Franz Xaver Kapus

Whose only claim to unique celebrity

Were Rainer Maria Rilke’s UberLetters

To a Young Poet’s incarnate immortality.

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Three reasons I like to read not-so-well-known blogs

Excellent post and this does not come from a fan of the blogging mutual admiration society. One reason I’ve identified why my blog is still confidential (beside reason 1) after 6+ months, is that I have “the bum between 2 chairs” as Voltaire would put it: promoting my coaching, exploring and experimenting with my new “niche” with the metaphor/archetype of Icarus :coaching young (less young?) passionate souls (the artist for ex) in a dispassionate (as over pragmatic) professional climate. So the need to be, look, feel pro on the one hand. On the other hand, I enjoy genuinely connecting through blogging and sometimes it’s not so pro…carnivalesque even, with the breaking of boundaries (fool archetype) this mode of interaction sometimes entails: oops! But I don’t think I would have learned so much about the people I am interested to coach without taking this risk. Electronic words stay, be careful of reputation, I hear from colleagues: Diderot’s prudent ‘esprit de l’escalier”, for another reason of not being so well known does take over at times. A pity. I’m not the type to live a double life separating the pro from the casual, even though some limits in the right place are warranted, I admit. Does such a blog semi-pro, semi-blogging has a chance? We’ll see. For the meantime, I am still enjoying the experiment.
Michal at Happy Heuristics!

bottledworder

Full many a gem of purest ray serene
The dark unfathomed caves of ocean bear:
Full many a flower is born to blush unseen,
And waste its sweetness on the desert air. (from “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” by Thomas Gray)

There are certainly many excellent established blogs out there. I love to read them. But I also like to scour the blogopsphere for hidden gems.

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Notes on Saving Icarus: Lin Yutang’s Pseudo-Scientific Formula for Wisdom

Self-Realization vs Self-Help

Our century is filled with formulas for living, statistical  empirical studies, tests and proofs of what brings happiness, what constitutes the good life that, you may notice, provided you don’t get caught in the hype, only corroborate age old wisdom for happy happening, found in every cultures and especially religious traditions/institutions, like marriage, going to church/synagogue and other rituals, respect of the elders etc…   The promise of Seligman’s learned optimism against learned helplessness, started with humanistic psychology, has degenerated into the overly statistical science of happiness, known as positive psychology. Continue reading